Anadolu Kavağı

Anadolu Kavağı was inside the prohibited military zone until 1946. No nonmuslims were allowed in the village. Identification papers were checked at the ferry pier. Both Anadolu Kavağı and Rumeli Kavağı coasts were considered holy sites for their owners before the Turkish. Their unstable and grumpy nature seemed like the mouth of a monster from which the Black Sea sailors were always afraid. So no ship would sail upon this horrible sea without consecrations and sacrifices.

The Kavak market’s stores were open all night to allow sailors who stayed up during the night, waiting for suitable weather. Thus, earnings were high Legend has it that very old, tall cypresses were called kavak (poplar) and the village’s name was Kavak because of this. Another story says that the famous kavak fig of the village was the source of its name. Moreover, according to Andreossy, when Mehmed the Conqueror laid siege to Istanbul, he procured the small basalt stones that would punch holes in the city walls from Kavak.

Ali Reis of Midillli, one of the later founders of the village has more than one shrine. One of those is his mosque. Pasha is resting in a tomb next to the mosque. Murad IV. builds a fort to Anadolu Kavağı, along with the Rumeli Kavağı fort to prevent Russian and Cossack raids. Evliya Çelebi writes, “It is a Muslim town from its first day. It has around 800 households in the center, seven masjids, one bath, around 200 stores, single houses, child school and a fountain. Its population consists of sailors, vinegrowers and tradesmen. The Kavak Quarantine House was built in 1838 for the quarantine operations that the Ottoman administrators have long valued. The wonderful sea, fresh fish, air and greenery made Anadolu Kavağı a favorite stop for the people of Istanbul at all times.

Anadolu Kavağı

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