Polonezköy

The village was established by the Polish Prince Adam Chartorisky in 1842. Prince Adam bought all the lands that are Polonezköy today with the permission and supervision of the Ottoman State, and settled some of the Polish soldiers and immigrants here. He provided location, tools and animals for those who settled for farming. The land belonged to the Lazaris Priests before that. The Lazarist Priests who were mentioned in Three Musketeers and the “Name of the Rose” by Umberto Eco, were pious Christians who strove to live like simple and sincere Jesuits just like in Jesus’ time. They were excommunicated by the Pope because of this. These pious Christians are expulsed from all the countries in Europe. The Ottoman State welcomes them and assigns them these lands to allow them to live their religion freely. They build a monastery, and a farm around it. As their population dwindles in time, the Lazarist Priests sell these lands to their Polish Christian brethren who are forced refugees.

Willy Sperco, in his work Istanbul at the Beginning of the Century, writes, “Polonezköy offers a clean bed, a warm soup, fresh eggs, delicious milk and butter to those who ask, it is a calm, peaceful retreat.” The village doesn’t lose this quality despite the centuries that passed.

People of Istanbul who want to escape the tiring city life and who wish to spend some time in nature, come to this corner of the earth, this retreat that has its own culture and humanity, and that can create surprising moments. There is a zoo, picnic sites, running and hiking courses in and around the village. The hostel tourism that started in the 1990s has a more professional look today. Each year in June, the village holds a cherry festival. Although their numbers are few, there are still citizens of Polish origin in the village.

Polonezköy

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